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Caregiver Corner

Caregivers play a critical role in the health and well-being of their loved ones. The Caregiver Corner is here to help with useful links and resources. Everyone’s caregiver story is different, but below are some common questions received at the Eldercare Locator.



  1. Who can help me with transportation, in-home care (bathing, dressing, sitter services, preparing meals) and other local services such as respite care that I may not even know about?

    Your local Area Agency on Aging can connect you to information about transportation options and in-home care support (bathing, dressing, sitter services, preparing meals). They can also inform you about other local caregiving services, like those provided under the National Family Caregiver Support Program. To find an Area Agency on Aging that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

  2. My father is a veteran. What programs could he or his spouse be eligible for?

    Caregivers of veterans can contact the VA Caregiver Support Line online or on the phone at 1-855-260-3274. The VA Caregiver Support Line is available Monday through Friday from 9 am – to 8 pm EST. Counselors can answer questions and provide information about resources and support for veterans and their caregivers.

    Learn about initiatives underway to support community living for Veterans.

  3. Can I get paid for caregiving?

    Some states have programs that provide funding or reimbursement to family caregivers. The eligibility, reimbursement policies for these programs vary by state. For information on what, if any, caregiver reimbursement programs are available in your state, contact your local Area Agency on Aging. To find an Area Agency on Aging that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

  4. Who can I call for free or low-cost legal assistance?

    Legal assistance programs help people with low and moderate incomes with legal needs. Programs and services offered differ by state and are often dependent on funding sources. To find a legal aid program that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

  5. My mother has been diagnosed with dementia. Where can I go to learn more about what to expect?

    Learn more about programs and support services for persons with dementia by calling the Alzheimer’s Association 24/7 Helpline at 1-800-272-3900. In addition, Alzheimers.gov is the federal government portal to information on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias care, research, and support.

  6. Where can I get help understanding Medicare, Medicaid and prescription assistance programs?

    State Health Insurance Counseling Programs (SHIPS) offers no-cost, unbiased health benefit counseling, education and advocacy services to help empower people to make informed benefit decisions. To find a SHIP that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

  7. I have a complaint about the quality of care my friend is receiving in a nursing home. Who can I call?

    The Long Term Care Ombudsman (LTCO) advocates for residents in nursing homes and assisted living communities. While the LTCO does not license or regulate facilities, they protect the rights of residents and can provide education to family members and caregivers about the state’s licensing authority. To find a LTCO program that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

  8. I live pretty far away. Where can I learn more about programs for my parent who lives in another state?

    Area Agencies on Aging can provide information about services and programs that are offered in local communities. To find an Area Agency on Aging that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page. The National Institute on Aging offers tips and information to help you with long distance caregiving.

  9. I am concerned about a situation involving my neighbor. Where do I report suspected elder abuse?

    In the event of an emergency related to elder abuse, call 911. All instances of suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation involving an older adult should be reported to the designated adult protective services program in your state. All reports are confidential. To find the contact information for the adult protective services program that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page. The Eldercare Locator publication, Older Adults and Elder Abuse, provides additional information about elder abuse.

  10. Where can I find more information about senior activities and wellness programs?

    Your local Area Agency on Aging can help provide information about senior activities and wellness programs. To find an Area Agency on Aging that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

  11. Where can I learn more about housing options, including independent living, subsidized housing and assisted living?

    Your local Area Agency on Aging can help provide information about housing options. To find an Area Agency on Aging that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

    You may visit the Housing section for additional information about housing options and resources.

  12. My brother is not yet 60 but has a disability. Is there a statewide number to call so I can learn more about programs for people with disabilities?

    All states operate Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs). Many are also coordinated through local Area Agencies on Aging. ADRCs can connect you to critical programs and services in your area. To find an Aging and Disability Resource Center that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page.

  13. I am a caregiver. How do I work with my employer?

    Check with your human resources department or employee assistance program at your workplace to learn more about company leave policies or other guidelines and regulations of your employer. Visit the Family Caregiver Alliance and AARP websites to learn more about work and eldercare issues.

  14. How do I handle family conflict?

    Open communication and family meetings are important parts of caregiving. A counselor or mediator may be able to help families resolve disagreements and difficult situations. Your local Area Agency on Aging can connect you to information and resources that may be helpful for family members facing challenging situations. To find an Area Agency on Aging that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page. The National Institute on Aging offers tips for sharing caregiver responsibilities among family members.

  15. I am a caregiver. How do I know that I am making the right decisions?

    Having good open communication with the person receiving care is an important first step. Become informed about local programs and services, including caregiver support groups. Your local Area Agency on Aging can help provide information about resources and providers. The National Institute on Aging offers helpful information about things to consider when making decisions on care. To find an Area Agency on Aging that serves your area, enter your ZIP code or city and state in the search bar at the top of this page. The Family Caregiver Alliance sponsors a secure online service and offers a personal dashboard of information, support and resources for caregivers.

There is a wealth of information available online designed to assist family members and caregivers of older adults. Here are a few useful links to get you started.

Healthfinder.gov provides health information and tools on variety of topics including caregiving.

National Institute on Aging provides several guides and factsheets that provide help and assistance for caregivers.

VA Caregiver Support Program connects caregivers to their local caregiver support specialists who can share information about several service options and programs for Veterans.

AARP Caregiving provides information and resources to assist family caregivers.

Alzheimer's Association assists individuals with Alzheimer's disease in finding good care in their community.

ARCH-The National Respite Locator Servicehelps parents, caregivers and professionals find respite services in their state and local area that match their specific needs.

Family Caregiver Alliancefeatures information on programs at the national, state and local levels that support and sustain caregivers.

Grandfamilies.org serves as a national resource in support of grandparents and other relatives raising children within and outside the child welfare system.

Caregiver Action Network provides education, peer support, and resources to family caregivers across the country free of charge.

National Alliance for Caregiving provide links to resources to help family caregivers.

Training Curriculum: Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has created a curriculum to train the primary care workforce about dementia care. A curriculum for caregivers is also offered on the website.